What herbs and spices can you share with your dog? Part 2

January 16th, 2019

 

Last week I gave you some ideas for ways you can start to introduce the health and wellness benefits of fresh herbs into yours and your dog’s life.

I spoke about basil and shared a lovely Basil Oil Recipe you can make and use to flavour your meal and your dog’s dinner! I also shared a useful Rosemary Extract Recipe, for the gardeners out there, that can be used as a preventative care against mould, caterpillars, whiteflies, and the potato beetle. And lastly, a soothing Ginger Tea, perfect for those cold winter days.

This week I’m continuing with some more of my favourite herbs and natural goodness.

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

Parsley is another great herb for dogs because it is high in antioxidants, fibre, vitamins, and minerals. It can enhance the functionality of your dog’s organs and flush toxins out of the body. Parsley is diuretic and promotes the flow of urine.

Parsley also stimulates the uterus so it is better to avoid it during your dog’s pregnancy.

This herb is a common ingredient in dog biscuits as it can freshen a dog’s breath.

Parsley is very easy to grow on your window sill, so it no excuse to not always have some handy.

Flax Seeds

Flax seeds have been one of the ingredients in my breakfast bowl for years. And occasionally I sprinkle my dogs’ food with it too.

Flax seeds contain high amounts of Omega 3 fatty acids, and they are also high in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. They help to detox the body but it’s important to use ground flax seeds rather than serving whole flax seeds.

Typically, both brown and golden flax seeds will offer similar nutritional benefits, and just remember that a little bit goes a long way!

Green Tea

I love green tea … now. I didn’t use to, as I didn’t like the bitterness of it. However, I was aware of the benefits so I kind of trained myself to drink it. And now I love it! Especially a freshly made cup from loose leaves.

Green tea is a type of tea that is made from Camellia sinensis leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong teas and black teas.

Green tea originated in China, but its production and manufacture have spread too many other countries in Asia.

Green tea is a great source of antioxidants that have been credited with a range of health benefits, from promoting heart, liver and brain health to improving your skin.
It even has calming properties.

When I make green tea and it’s cooled down a bit, I just pour a few spoons of tea over my dogs’ food. Just please make sure that if you are giving green tea to your dog, that you use decaf green tea because the caffeine can actually cause adverse reactions in your dog.

 

Jitka xx

What herbs and spices can you share with your dog? Part 1

January 9th, 2019

 

I think everybody would agree, fresh herbs and spices add a lovely smell and flavour to our meals. Fresh herbs also add vitamins like A, C and K to our food and they are packed with antioxidants.

And not only that, by adding flavour with the herbs, we can cut back on the salt!

But here’s a thought … have you ever considered adding some herbs to your dog’s food?

Fresh herbs are able to promote better health and wellness for you AND your dog! So, why not try it?

Most of the herbs are easy to grow. You don’t even need to have a garden or back yard, you can simply grow them on your inside window sill just like I do with some of mine.

Only my sage, lavender, rosemary and marjoram are now grown outside because they have flourished quite a bit over the year’s 😊

Here are some ideas for ways you can introduce the health and wellness benefits of fresh herbs into yours and your dog’s life!

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

One of my all-time favourites! I love to place a few whole leaves on my avocado & hummus toast and happily munch on it. Or I chop it up with some sun dried tomatoes and spread that on toast… but back to the dogs …lol!

Basil has antioxidant, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties, and is full of vitamins and minerals.

Basil also helps with digestion, and in the dry form you can find this herb in many digestive teas to relieve stomach spasms.

How to make basil oil:

* Bunch of basil
* 1l sweet almond oil or olive oil

In the mortar, crush basil leaves, and when they start to release their aroma start adding the oil. Then put the oil with the leaves into a clean jar or a bottle with a lid, and add the rest of the oil. Close the jar and leave it for two weeks, occasionally shaking the content. Then you can use the oil to flavour your meal, your dog’s dinner, and you can even use it for massaging your tired sore muscles.

Did you know basil is associated with immortality? And apparently, it can make a person more attractive and even help to find love…

Well… try and let me know 😊

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

 

Me & my rosemary

This lovely herb is high in iron, calcium, and Vitamin B6, and has also been shown to act as an antioxidant.

Rosemary supports circulation, calms the mind, and relaxes internal tension. It can also help with some types of migraines.

If you enjoy gardening, you will find rosemary very useful here too. With dry rosemary, you can make a spray that can be used as a preventative care against mould, caterpillars, whiteflies, and the potato beetle.

How to make rosemary extract:

* 220g of dry crushed rosemary
* 700ml of 50% alcohol (if you can’t get this, vodka will do)
* 10-15 ml liquid soap
* Water

Pour alcohol over rosemary and leave it to infuse for two days. After two days, sieve it and add the liquid soap. Add about 130ml of the extract into 1 litre of water. With this amount of extract, you can make 6-7 litres of spray.

Personally, I haven’t tried it yet, as I didn’t do much gardening last year. But I will definitely try it this year.

Ginger (Zingiber officinalis)

I am a big fan of ginger tea, especially now in winter. When I can feel the cold is coming, it’s the first thing I do … make a ginger tea.

Ginger root is anti-inflammatory, and also has antibacterial properties. It helps aid in the absorption of food, and boosts the digestive system. It is also a great way to treat motion sickness because it helps to soothe nausea. Some pet owners even give it to their pets to help boost circulation. It can either be served finely chopped or dried and ground.

How to make ginger tea:

* 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
* 1 cup boiling water
* Sometimes I add a bit of cinnamon and/or cardamom
* Lemon and/or honey or agave syrup for flavour, if the tea is too spicy for you

Boil the water and then add it to the cup with grated ginger. Steep the tea, covered, for at least 5 minutes. Strain and discard ginger and serve warm. Finally, add lemon, honey, agave syrup … if you like.

Jitka xx

Happy New Year! Happy New You?

January 2nd, 2019

 

 

 

Happy New Year Everyone!!

Into which of these categories do you fit?

A: You make a New Year’s resolution and by the end of January, you can’t even remember you made any…

B: You make a New Year’s resolution, you stick with it and you feel the pride of achievement.

C: You don’t bother with New Year’s resolutions because you know you’re not going to stick with it, so why to even try…

I am somewhere in between all three…

It’s hard to change, and it’s hard to adopt a new good habit. And it takes time … 66 days on average.

I found this interesting article from James Clear on ‘How Long Does it Actually Take to Form a New Habit?’, you can read it here: https://jamesclear.com/new-habit.
Phillippa Lally is a health psychology researcher at University College London. In a study https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ejsp.674 published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, Lally and her research team decided to figure out just how long it actually takes to form a habit.

The study examined the habits of 96 people over a 12-week period. Each person chose one new habit for the 12 weeks and reported each day on whether or not they did the behaviour and how automatic the behaviour felt.

Some people chose simple habits like “drinking a bottle of water with lunch.” Others chose more difficult tasks like “running for 15 minutes before dinner.” At the end of the 12 weeks, the researchers analysed the data to determine how long it took each person to go from starting a new behaviour to automatically doing it.

The answer?

On average, it takes more than 2 months before a new behaviour becomes automatic — 66 days to be exact.

And how long it takes a new habit to form can vary widely depending on the behaviour, the person, and the circumstances. In Lally’s study, it took anywhere from 18 days to 254 days for people to form a new habit.

One of my new habits is to drink more water. It’s very easy in summer but in winter… I know I should because 70% of our body is water, and I know I will feel better, and I know my skin looks better, and I know I have more energy.

So, I decided, at the beginning of December, I AM going to drink more water consciously. I set up my alarm every hour, and every hour I’m having a large glass of water. I’ve been building this new habit for about 30 days, so 33 more to go and I won’t need an alarm. I hope, lol!

Another new habit I’m starting on the 1st of January is to learn two new words in French and Spanish every day… so by the end of 2019 I will know 730 French words and 730 Spanish words… then I just need to learn how to use them 😊

Have an absolutely paw-some 2019!!

Love, Jitka xx

P.S. If your new habit is going greener in 2019, then keep a lookout for a little free gift from me to you coming in the New Year

Astrology & Dogs … Yes or No?

December 26th, 2018

 

I have mixed feelings when it comes to astrology. I will occasionally read my horoscope, and if it’s a good one I will like it and believe it, but if it’s a bad or strange one, I will ignore it and think what a lot of ….

Just out of interest I dug into the horoscopes of my dogs and some of the things I read there are pretty interesting. Here are some:

Mr. Tank, Scottie ~ Aries: March 21 – April 20

The sign of Aries is the Ram which is ruled by the planet Mars. Mars is known as “the bright and burning one” ruled by passion and drive. Aries is a fire sign which makes the Aries dog confident and strong. Taking no for an answer is not in their mindset. When an Aries dog does not come when they are called, don’t take it personally. As a fire sign, the Aries dog is extremely smart and playful. They want to be the centre of your world and your possessions. Naturally inquisitive and self-assured, the Aries dog can find themselves getting into accidents and you may find yourself at the vet more than you would like.

According to this all terriers should be Aries as taking no for an answer is definitely not normal and they also have pretty strong selective hearing. But again it all depends what kind of treats I have in my pocket! Luckily there’ve been no accidents in Mr. Tank’s life, and I don’t think he is as inquisitive as he thinks he is.

Martha, Scottie ~ Leo: July 21 – August 20

The sign of Leo is the Lion which is ruled by the Sun. The sun is warming, noble, and generous. Leo is a fire sign with energy to burn. Leos love the outdoors and everything that comes with it. They also enjoy barking. It doesn’t matter if a Leo dog is with you or at the dog park, he or she loves to be the centre of attention. A huge positive of having a dog with their sign in Leo is that they are the most loyal dogs in the zodiac.

This pretty much fits on Martha! Endless energy, centre of attention, organising everyone and she does enjoy barking … sometimes even for no reason. Or at least I don’t know the reason… I’m sure she has one?

Rosie ~ Taurus: April 21 – May 20

The sign of Taurus is the Bull which is ruled by the planet Venus. Venus is the planet of love, beauty, and gentleness. Taurus is an earth sign and creates a lot of willpower. The Taurus dog wants to have their cake and eat it too. When they want to do something, then that is the way it is going to be. Taurus dogs are inherently shy and need to feel safe. They love to be shown affection but only when they are in the mood. The Taurus dog needs a balanced and peaceful environment. Loud noises and chaos will get them stressed and upset.

Yes, Rosie is beautiful and gentle, and yes she has lots of willpower to get the forgotten snack out of my hand bag, to bark in the morning until I get up and feed her … but Rosie, shy? No way. She is one of the most confident dogs I’ve ever had, loud noises don’t bother here (actually she loves fireworks and gets really excited from all the bangs and lights), she ignores any chaos … and stress and upset? I’ve seen her upset only once when she had a sick puppy and didn’t know what to do with it. That was upsetting for all of us.

If you want to find out more about dogs and astrology, take a look at this article in Dogs Naturally magazine and I’d love to know, in the comments below, if the horoscope matches your dog’s personality or not?

Jitka xx

Vita Canis Style to Rescue 2018 mentioned as one of the highlight events of 2018!

December 20th, 2018

I was recently asked to contribute to an article for TG Magazine, where I shared some of the highlights of the 2018 Style to Rescue Dog Grooming Competition and I wanted to share these with you!

In a recent issue of the TG magazine, Heidi Anderton looked back at some of the most innovative products, services, and events in 2018. To my delight, she mentioned Vita Canis Style to Rescue, but not only that, we were mentioned as one of the highlights of 2018.

For all of us who organised this event, it was definitely the highlight. And as you can see in some of the comments, below, that were left for us from the rescue centres, it was the same for them and their dogs as well!
And not forgetting, Style to Rescue was also nominated for event of the year in the industry achievement awards. We are so proud of this nomination.

Looking ahead, as you know, we are already preparing for the 2019 event which will be even better and hopefully will raise even more much-needed money for the rescue centres. The date for your diary is 28th April 2019 … save it!

We will have fantastic speakers and demonstrations on the day such as; Julie Harris who will be talking about skin and hair; Adam Dunn, the dog behaviourist, will share his tips and advice on dog training, Denise Westbrook will host a demo with one of her lovely poodles and Alison Rogers with one of her bichons.

Here are few words from the rescue centres that took a part in Style to Rescue 2018:
The Style to Rescue grooming competition was an absolutely amazing experience. I am not a groomer but a supporter and fundraiser of Many Tears who was asked if I could go along with a stall and dog for grooming. I have to admit that as I am not a groomer that I had never heard of Vita Canis and had no idea what to expect from a grooming competition. It was fantastic and the Vita Canis staff, judges and groomers were so friendly, made us feel so welcome and took amazing care of our dogs. Many Tears is a rescue which mainly takes in ex-breeders and unsold puppies. We really appreciate being asked to attend Style to Rescue and are busier than ever, with so many dogs needing our help. It is only through support like this that we are able to continue as we take in many dogs with serious medical problems that need addressing such as spinal problems, heart problems etc, that the vet bills are vast. We are so grateful for donations and financial support as well as positivity and raising awareness of what we do, which are invaluable and we need them more than ever. Vita Canis Style to Rescue provided this, funds to help with operations and the opportunity to raise awareness of the Many Tears and the dogs looking for homes.

~ Liz Middleton, Many Tears

I would like to say a massive thank you to everyone that was involved in this event, as a rescue, any help that we can get with the dogs is always appreciated and most welcome.

Alexa is now with her new family, she looked so lovely after she had been to the grooming competition, and how could they not resist her! Oh and she smelled gorgeous too!

Goofy was also lucky enough to be included in the grooming event, when he first came to me he was unrecognisable, he was very matted and dirty, but just look at his transformation, and now he is happy with his new mum and his pals.

Brian is such a special little dog that has had such a terrible life before coming to me, he looked fantastic after his makeover and is now with a fantastic family.

~ Hessa Riddett, Hessa’s Homeless Hounds

When Rhia-Louise and I were asked to supply dogs for the Style to Rescue competition we were nervous and excited all at once. We were excited because people would see my amazing dogs with their disabilities. But we asked ourselves: How will our dogs react? They all have been hurt in some way by humans from all over the world. And now they would be handled by strangers… Then I have to choose dogs that needed a haircut. So off we went with 5 dogs out of my 25: Thomas Cook, Macey Gray, Patrick Swayze, Sammy Davis Jr, Mildred Rooper and of course Sir Elton John. The day was so well organised and we had the best time in years. My dogs were treated like royalty. Everyone was so gentle to them. Patrick Swayze was the hardest to trim as he has a kind of Parkinson disease and he shakes a lot. All the groomers were lovely and kind, and happy to work with disabled dogs, even if they were in wheels like Sir Elton John. My dogs came away looking the best they have ever looked and feeling on top of the world. We were given sooo many presents for the dogs, you couldn’t see out of our Fiat 500. A couple of days later I received a phone call from Jitka that the cheque for just under £1500 was coming for what they had raised on the day. The money was used straight away for two big operation on two disabled dogs’ leg operations. I can’t thank enough for a fabulous day and we can’t wait for next year, when 9 of my rescue dogs will be coming for a time of their lives.

~ Claire – Louise Nixon, Wheels to Paws UK

Note: We still have space for even more stands and we never say no to any sponsors! If you would like to donate something for our online auction on our Facebook Group, Vita Canis Style to Rescue, please don’t hesitate to contact me on vitacanis@hotmail.co.uk.

Jitka xx

Gratitude

December 12th, 2018

It’s 1:24 am on a Saturday morning and I’m sitting here, at Stansted airport car park, writing this blog. I have nothing else to do except to wait for the recovery …

I was traveling from Slovakia, and even though we took off a bit late, we still landed on time. I got to my car, and my battery was flat… the recovery vehicle turned up after around half an hour and couldn’t recharge the battery. So now I’m waiting for another one to tow me and my car back home. And my phone battery is almost flat too … and even though I found a socket at the coach station, for some reason my charge is not working!?

I can’t even read as it’s too dark, so I’m extremely grateful for this laptop which means I can at least do something. I’m also grateful that it’s fully charged.

Sitting here typing this made me realise that even though I may be stuck here for hours, and I don’t know what time I’ll get home, and I know I’ll be tired and super busy with catching up with everything once I get there … eventually … but I still choose to keep calm and instead of worrying, I’m making a list of all the things I’m grateful for. So here goes:

I’m grateful for:

* The time I spent with my family back home in Slovakia
* I still have my parents, we can still laugh together, play cards, watch films and listening to their constant bickering, which can be pretty annoying but hey ho … I can always zone out!
* Coming home to my lovely dogs who would be ever so excited to see me
* Coming home to John (should I mention him before the dogs? Lol 😂) and tell him all about my trip
* The tights I kept under my jeans even though I was so hot at the airport (thanks, mum!)
* Woolly hat, scarf and gloves
* Third cup of delicious Nero coffee with oat milk
* The recovery company who keep calling me every 20 min to check on me
* And!! The recovery car that is taking me to Toddington services, where I am going to spend a few hours at Travelodge (booked and paid by the recovery company – thank you!!) before I go home later in the morning.

Whatever situation life throws at us there is always something to be grateful for. Even if it is just a little thing like waking up in your own bed 😊

What are you grateful for today?

Jitka xx

Have you tried turmeric?

December 5th, 2018

I came across turmeric when I was a teenager when I started to become interested in cooking, especially using spices and flavours. I didn’t know the benefits of turmeric back then and I was mainly using it to colour my rice yellow so it looked a bit different on the plate. All the exotic spices like ginger, chilli, and cardamom took me to far off places I dreamed about visiting one day. I tried to improvise and cook Indian food, but with no internet, and no foreign cookbooks it was pretty difficult. And, I had never really tasted proper Indian food so I didn’t even have anything to compare it with! But I liked it, and I did eventually get to have my first curry in 2003 when I visited the UK for the very first time.

When I tried turmeric  for the first time I never thought that one day I would give it to my dogs!? And now 30 years later that’s exactly what I find myself doing, and on a regular basis too. So there’s another thing I share with my dogs, turmeric!

Turmeric, also known as Indian saffron has been used for over 4,000 years in alternative medicine. Turmeric is commonly used in Ayurveda medicine for wound healing and treating skin problems. But there is more to it. In a study from 2014, it was proven that curcumin, the main ingredient in turmeric, was stronger and more effective in people with arthritis than ibuprofen. Curcumin worked well as a painkiller without the gastrointestinal problems and side effects.

Curcumin is able to block enzyme supporting growth of tumours and it has been proven it can help as a preventative care and as a support treatment in cancer, including prostate, skin, and colon cancer.

Curcumin is the most researched component of turmeric, and it also has antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties, and can help in the fight against cancer, diabetes, and gastrointestinal problems.

So, how much should you give your dog?

¼ teaspoon of finely grated root for 4kg of body weight.

Dr. Jean Dodds, veterinary immunologist, recommends dividing this amount and giving it to a dog 3 times a day, to secure an even, stable level of curcumin in the blood. Another thing to note is that curcumin is not water soluble, so to increase its absorption, it is recommended to serve turmeric with coconut oil, olive oil or salmon oil.

Have you tried turmeric?

Jitka xx

And relax…

November 28th, 2018

The weeks before Christmas can be very hectic, and it seems like Christmas arrives a little earlier each year?

In times like this, we forget, or we are too tired, to look after ourselves. We don’t drink enough water, instead choosing tea or coffee or cola to quench our thirst, we feel too tired or have no time for exercise, and it’s all too tempting when we don’t feel like preparing a healthy meal for ourselves, to just grab some chocolate to fill us up … sound familiar?

Christmas time should be about relaxing and spending time with loved ones, but for many people, the weeks before can be very stressful.

Excessive physical or mental strain can cause the bodies stress response to kick in. If we feel stressed for a long time and/or constantly tense, this can be very damaging to many organs in our bodies. Scientists discovered that in cases like this the body gradually fixes the physique’s unhealthy reaction, creating a chain of processes that will change immunological stability to a pathological condition that can manifest in disease.

So with this in mind, it’s important to try to find a little bit of balance in our everyday lives. It’s not easy, but it is doable. Every little thing you do for yourself can help to make you feel better, or even more balanced. Things like just a few drops of essential oil in your oil burner or bath.

Depending on how you feel, or how you want to feel, you can choose from relaxing, uplifting, calming, energizing … so many different essential oils to choose from.

Here’s a recap of two of my favourites:

Sweet Orange – Citrus sinesis

When the days are dark, gloomy, wet and cold, inhaling sweet orange is like bringing sunshine to your life. The refreshing and cheerful character of this oil brings joy and warmth to your day. In situations when we take life too seriously, we forget to laugh, or we fear the unknown, this is when we should choose sweet orange.

Rosemary – Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary is a brilliant, invigorating essential oil. This oil is known for its stimulating effect on the central nervous system and is used for poor concentration. Inhaling rosemary is also recommended for respiratory problems, such as bronchitis and sinusitis.

Rosemary should not be used during pregnancy, and by people suffering from epilepsy or high blood pressure.

For me, there is nothing better than a nice hot relaxing bath, with my favourite essential oil, after a long and tiring day in the salon.

If you’ve never tried using essential oils in the bath before, there are a few things you should consider:

Using essential oils directly in a bath is very likely to cause skin irritation. Hot water makes the skin more sensitive, and because essential oils don’t dissolve in water they will contact your skin undiluted.

There are some commonly known dispersants like Epsom salts, table salt, full-fat milk, or even vodka … but they don’t work. Instead of these, you can use vegetable oil – jojoba or fractionated coconut oil are very good because they are less greasy.

If you wish to use salts, this is fine, but just be sure to dilute the essential oils in the vegetable oil first and then add the Epsom salt, Dead sea salt or table salt.

The mixture of essential oils and vegetable oils will float on water, some will stick to the side of the bath and also on your skin, so the whole experience can be a bit slippery, so do be careful!

Foaming baths are also good for diluting essential oils, just add 5-10 drops of your favourite essential oil in about 15ml (1 tablespoon) of bath base.

Inhale. Exhale. Enjoy 😊

 

Watch out for the toxic beauty.

November 21st, 2018

 

Having mischievous terriers, I’m always aware of where to put new plants, decorations, and even the Christmas tree!

I love the Yucca plant and had one for a few years until my Scottie Tank, out of the blue, decided it was time to re-plant it. He dug the soil out of the pot and proceeded to chew the stem along with a few leaves. I was speechless. The soil was everywhere (thank goodness we have a stone floor), and the plant completely butchered … but he looked very satisfied with his work. It was only years later that I found out the Yucca, amongst some other household plants, contains alkaloids, saponins, glycosides, and that they can cause symptoms of poisoning.

The signs of intoxication can show after some time with salivation, vomiting, lethargy, and diarrhoea. Thankfully Mr. Tank didn’t have any of these symptoms, he killed the plant but didn’t eat any of its parts … but if he had, a trip to the vet’s would be inevitable.

As Christmas is approaching, and seasonal plants and flower arrangements begin to appear in our homes, we need to be aware that despite their beauty, some of them can be dangerous to our pets.

The poinsettia which is native to Mexico is a very popular Christmas and holiday plant grown indoors, mainly for the attractive red flower heads and green foliage. Please keep this plant away from your pets as it contains certain diterpenes, which are poisonous to animals. They can cause irritation inside the mouth, vomiting, diarrhoea with blood, and liver damage.

Another typical Christmas plant, mistletoe, contains plant proteins called viscotoxins, which on the cellular level are poisonous to all animals including birds. They can be found in the stems and leaves during winter and affect the digestive and respiratory tracts of animals.

As the countdown begins we also start gathering more sweets and chocolates and other goodies in our homes … we’re like little hamsters stockpiling, lol 😋. Over indulgence with these goodies can make us feel good for a moment but then uncomfortable, we can experience a sugar rush and even belly ache can appear… and what about our dogs? Well, for them it can be much worse. I wrote a blog in the summer about common foods that are not good for your dog which you can read here.

Keep your dogs’ safe this pre-holiday and holiday season!

Jitka xx

The Power of Nature is Hidden in our Products – PART TWO

November 14th, 2018

 

Shea Butter in Paw Butter and Hand Butter

I’ve never tried shea butter for cooking but I love the nutty smell of unrefined shea butter and the feel of it on my skin. When you first apply shea butter it feels a bit heavy but then it makes a nice silky film on your skin.

Shea butter is a fat that’s been extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. It is usually yellow in colour when raw, with more processed versions being ivory or white in colour.

Due to its cinnamic acid and other natural properties, shea butter is anti-inflammatory. One compound, in particular, lupeol cinnamate, was found to reduce skin inflammation. This anti-inflammatory agent has a healing effect on conditions like scars and stretch marks, rashes, scrapes, small wounds, eczema, ulcered skin etc. Shea butter aids in the skin’s natural collagen production and contains oleic, stearic, palmitic and linolenic acids that protect and nourish the skin to prevent drying.

Shea butter helps cell regeneration and capillary circulation, and therefore it is very good for aging skin. It is humectant (absorbs moisture from the air) so it is also excellent for dry skin. (L. Price; Carrier oils for aromatherapy and massage, 2012). With long-term use of our Hand Butter, many people report skin softening and strengthening.

German Chamomile essential oil in Skin Relief, Hand Butter & Paw Butter

I love the smell of German chamomile and the dark blue colour always fascinated me. I wouldn’t think a natural product would be blue, would you? Green, white, beige, even red… but blue?

The chemical compound chamazulene is responsible for the colour of German chamomile which is also an anti-inflammatory agent. German chamomile has excellent anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and cicatrizant (healing properties, such as when our bodies form scar tissues) and relieves itchy skin.

I use German chamomile in my Skin Relief, Hand Butter and Paw Butter.

Peppermint Hydrosol

Peppermint hydrosol has the aroma of freshly crushed peppermint leaves but less intense compared to peppermint essential oil. When applied on the skin peppermint hydrosol combats itching and burning, and provides fast relief for allergic reactions, bites, and stings. This is why it is the main ingredient in the Skin Relief.

Jitka xx

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