Year of the Dog 2018

January 5th, 2018

YEAR OF THE DOG 2018
I read somewhere that 2018 should be a good time to make life changes. In fact, most people plan and even start some kind of life change in January. But for how many are these plans just a glimpse in a rear-view mirror by February?
And when it comes to our dogs, we often make new year resolutions: walk more, brush more, train more, put them on healthy diet etc.
So maybe one resolution could be to start a more natural, green way to look after your dog?
Here are some tips on how to start to ensure you continue!
Change of diet – Modern dog food is high in simple carbohydrates, low in protein, and full of unfavourable fats which is a perfect recipe for your dog to gain weight. So why not feed your dog a more traditional, natural diet? That’s a diet high in protein, low in carbohydrate with the right amount of good fat.
Every species needs to eat biologically appropriate food. For example, pandas must eat bamboo and dogs, like wolves, need high-quality animal protein to thrive. Next time you buy a food for your dog, check the labels. How much and what kind of protein is in your dog’s food? And how much is carbohydrates (rice, wheat, potato, corn)?

Do you feel confused or need more advise about feeding your dog? Ask the pro! Check Moddie Lambert’s Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1468256220143824/  Moddie is a qualified canine nutritionists who works with holistic vets and she will be happy to help. Also you can check her website https://www.simplyrawfeeding.co.uk.

If you are not ready for a big change, just do little things, like ditch the rawhide chews for natural treats. Do you know how a rawhide chew is made? Producing rawhide begins with the splitting of an animal hide, usually from cattle. The top layer is generally tanned and made into leather products, whilst the inner portion, in its “raw” state, goes to the dogs. Removing the hair from hides often involves a highly toxic recipe called sodium sulphide liming… Nasty stuff. And the rawhide chews are actually pretty dangerous, containing carcinogen FD&C Red 40, along with preservatives like sodium benzoate and others… Really, nothing can beat nice juicy raw bone for goodness and dogs love them best! Bones such as a cow’s femur or shoulder-blade, for example.

Natural insect & tick repellent – Ticks operate mainly by using their sense of smell. Ticks don’t jump or fall from trees; instead, they do something called “questing.” That is, they climb to the top of a blade of grass or plant and stick their front legs up in the air, waiting for the scent of a victim walking by. If you find one on your head, then it crawled there (ticks don’t jump) . Their front pair of legs have what are called Haller’s organs, which detect smell, temperature, movement and carbon dioxide. This is how they know you’re coming. They love warmth and moisture and are just waiting for a warm, moist environment to call home – such as your dog or you… The great discovery is that, for some reason, they are not attracted to the scent of some essential oils. Yippee!!
Certain essential oils smell soooo disgusting to ticks (it’s like the smells of food you don’t like or something even worse… cooked tripe… blah), that they would rather go hungry than come any closer to your dog! These include geranium, grapefruit, cedarwood, rosewood, lemongrass… all of these are in Vita Canis Tick Off, of course.

Natural skin & coat care products – one of my favourite shampoos to use on my dogs and in the salon is All Dogkind shampoo. It is an award winning shampoo using ethically sourced essential oils and other plant extracts. https://foralldogkind.co.uk/

Ear & Paw care: The contains some powerful anti-bacterial, anti–fungal, anti-inflammatory and anti–viral ingredients: Aloe Vera, Geranium, Witch Hazel and Lavender hydrosols, also called flower waters; and also two powerful essential oils: niaouli and lemon. Niaouli essential oil is a more gentle relative of the very popular Tea Tree oil. It is gentle and well-tolerated, a perfect oil for allergies manifesting themselves in the ear. It has powerful anti-histaminic and anti-bacterial properties. Lemon essential oil is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal as well as being an immunostimulant, meaning it helps to strengthen the body’s immune system.

As you can see, the word anti-bacterial is mentioned a few times. The biggest difference between natural and synthetic anti–bacterial products is that bacteria can build up a resistance to synthetic products but not to natural ones. “Why?” You ask. The simplest way to explain is that the synthetic product is always the same, each and every time, forever… So when bacteria come into contact with a synthetic anti-bacterial product for the first time, or the first few times, it gets killed. However, with a few more contacts the bacteria realise – actually we know how this works, we’re not scared of this one any more, it comes here all the time, acts the same way, nothing new – so we’ll just build our shield and protect ourselves… And so become resistant.

Our dogs’ paws can suffer in winter. The cold, the wet. The grit from the roads, as well as the central heating can play havoc with their pads, causing dryness and cracking; just like our hands when they are exposed to too many extremes of cold and heat. The pads of dog’s paws are designed to provide protection from the ground but also from invasion by bacteria, viruses and fungi. If the surface of the pad is damaged in some way then obviously this protection is not as effective as it should be. This can lead to discomfort for the dog and even a risk of infection.

 

Vita Canis Paw Butter is designed to guard against this in a number of ways, providing 100% natural protection for your dog’s paws:
When applied to the pads before walk, it creates a safe and effective barrier against cold, wet and muddy surfaces, nourishing the surface of the pads and helping to ensure that no small cracks or cuts develop. Additionally, its unique composition with its triple protection of anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties can help to safeguard your dog’s health and well-being on walks.

These are just a few tips but whatever your new year’s resolutions, remember even the longest journey starts with a single step, so take one today!

A happy dog is a healthy dog

October 23rd, 2017

A happy dog is a healthy dog

10th October was World Mental Health Day. It doesn’t say human mental health day so it made me think about dogs’ mental health. Can they have mental health problems? Do you look at your dog sometimes and think: he looks sad… depressed… why he is obsessively digging… or chewing his feet? Let’s have a look at some of the problems our dogs can face and how can we help.

What can cause a dog’s depression and what can we do?

First of all, we have to recognise the problem that’s leading to the depression. This can be:

Physical illness  Contact your vet to rule out a physical cause. If it is an illness, when your dog recovers, his mental health will improve as well.

Grief  Dogs can experience the grief just the same as us… when they lose their human or animal friend; when a family member moves out… all of this can cause depression.

Environmental Changes  Some changes like moving to a new home can affect a normally happy dog. It may take some time for the dog to adjust.

Us  When we are sick or depressed our dog is able to pick up on our energy and may begin to feel the same as we do. Also our dog can get depressed if we are not with him. This is called separation anxiety, which can show in different ways such as sadness, depression, barking, destroying the kitchen.. So what can we do?

• Exercise your dog and make it fun and interesting

• Teach your dog new tricks, games…

• Let him play with other dogs

• Get another dog. Especially if his depression is caused by losing a friend

• Seek the help of a dog behaviourist

Anxiety in Dogs
Anxiety in dogs has similar symptoms as in humans.
Common symptoms include:

• Trembling
• Withdrawal or hiding
• Excessive barking
• Attempts to escape
• Self-injuring behaviour
• Diarrhoea or vomiting.
• Reduced activity.
• Destructive behaviour

Separation anxiety is a frequent problem in dogs, because they have difficulties being alone. Dogs are pack animals and from birth they are used to be together with other dogs. So if our dog suddenly stays home alone, it is something completely new for him. But because of the way we live our dog has to learn how to be alone. Here are few tips on how to prevent separation anxiety:

1. Do not carry your puppy everywhere – it’s very tempting especially with a new puppy
2. When teaching your puppy to stay alone for long periods of time, start with just a few seconds, a minute, leave the puppy in a different room. A few drops of Comfort Blend on the dog’s bed can help. If the puppy is quiet, reward this behaviour, if not ignore it.
3. Do not pick your puppy up if she cries or jumps on you – little attention seeker 🙂
4. Reward your dog with attention when she is calm and quiet.
5. Always stick to the same routine before you leave your dog home alone.
6. Ignore your dog 20 minutes before you leave and 10 minutes after you return ( I know this is hard – but even a few minutes would help. And you have to think, I’d rather do this than deal with an anxious dog, which is very traumatising not only for the dog but for us as well). Comfort Blend can help you and your dog.
7. Leave your puppy with a friend, in doggy daycare, etc.
8. Make sure all of your dog’s needs are being met, like regular exercise, mental stimulations, etc.

How aromatherapy can help. 

There is no one single best essential oil for depression and anxiety. There are some oils, however, that work better than others on certain problems. That’s why in Vita Canis’ calming products, Comfort Blend and Aromatic Dog Spray Floral, you can find a synergetic blend of essential oils. Synergy is where the action of two or more substances (essential oils, in this case) achieve an effect, of which each is individually incapable. Let me mention a few of the oils I use: Bergamot essential oil in the Comfort Blend reduces nervous tension, anxiety, stress, insomnia, depression… It also stimulates the activity of certain hormones, dopamine and serotonin, which induces feelings of relaxation. Petitgrain essential oil has a relaxing effect, it helps overcome depression, anxiety and stress, and is uplifting. Sweet Basil is uplifting, refreshing, works well against depression and anxiety. Another important oil in our blend is Neroli essential oil. Like lavender, this essential oil is one of the most popular essential oils. It has a greatly relaxing effect on the body and mind, relieves muscle spasms and calms heart palpitations.

As a loving dog owners we can help our dogs. The more we know about depression and anxiety in dogs the easier it is to find ways to help.

Jitka xx

Clip or not to clip? That is the question…

August 9th, 2017

Clip or not to clip? That is the question…
I really hope summer isn’t over yet and that we’re still going to have some sunny, warm days… But even if we don’t, this post will still be relevant for next year – and every subsequent year.

Whilst I was visiting my parents in Slovakia, I came across a dog magazine called “Pes pritel cloveka”, which translates as “Dog, the human’s friend”. When I used to live in Slovakia, this was my favourite dog magazine ever. It was always full of interesting articles on dog training, behaviour, diet, breeds, etc. Over the years I’ve read many different dog magazines (UK, US) and I am happy to say that Pes pritel cloveka is still a very valuable read.
In the August issue I found an interesting article by Silvia Antalikova and MVDr. M.Stourac, CSc. about the pros and cons of clipping dogs in summer. Because this article is so good and eye-opening, I decided to translate it for my readers.
Should we clip a dog in summer?
The logical answer would be yes. If we help our dogs to get rid of their “winter accessories” they will feel better in summer. We too get rid of our thick winter coats when it gets warmer…
However, the coat of an animal has many more functions than just keeping the animal warm. It also protects the skin and the whole body from all the effects of the weather: cold, wind, heat and sun radiation.
Simply said – if we remove a dog’s coat, he/she will be hotter than if we leave the coat. Why?
The cover of the dog’s body is its coat, which is composed of individual hairs. The stronger hair we call guard hair; the finer, shorter hair is called the undercoat. The hair, the coat, acts as a protection against trauma, UV radiation, external weather conditions and various chemicals. Dependent on the attacks of the external environment, over time the ends of the hair tend to become damaged and collapse. The coat is replaced by the normal recovery process called moulting. Moulting allows the hair to stay in good condition. The cycle of moulting is affected by many factors including hormonal activity, length of daylight, heat, radiation, stress, and genetics. It is more pronounced in autumn and spring. Serious illness, stress and pregnancy can also cause a dramatic, total but temporary change of hair.
Most mammals try to keep an average skin temperature of about 29 degrees Celsius. The sun can warm the hair up to 66 degrees Celsius!
Very important in this case is conductivity. This is the speed taken for the temperature of the skin to equal the temperature of the surface of the coat. The lower the conductivity, the longer the skin stays cool. If the coat is long, for example, 15 cm, the conductivity will be 10.8, and the dog’s skin will remain cool for a long time, but if the same hair is cut to 2.5 cm, the conductivity will be 65 and the skin will be heated very quickly. And if the same hair is cut by the clippers to 3mm, the conductivity will be 520! The temperature of the skin will instantly be the same as the ambient temperature.
Double-coated breeds should never be clipped. Their coat features as an excellent insulation for both heat and frost. Air is a natural insulator, and the air “trapped” between the hair is really effective to maintain the body temperature in equilibrium. Breeds with these types of coat must be regularly brushed, especially in the spring season, when the undercoat is quickly released. This dead mass of hair can interfere with the circulation of air between the skin and the dog’s coat.
An important fact to realise is that dogs are not cooled by sweating like humans or horses. The coat does not stop/prevent a dog’s thermoregulation. Dogs are cooled with intense panting, and they sweat only on their paws.
It is true that black or dark colours attract sunlight more than light colours, however, the trimming of such a coat does not eliminate this fact. Black remains black, and we also risk sunburn or even skin cancer by clipping it. The skin of the dog has only 6-10 layers; therefore, it is more prone to sunburn than human skin with its 16-20 layers.
Unless there are skin issues (e.g. hot spot, skin infection, surgery), there is no reason to shave the coat. (Note of translator: I would also add a solid, matted coat should be clipped off.)
For a dog’s well-being we do best when we brush and comb him/her on a regular basis.
To this article I would like to add the following:
The last sentence of the article is talking about importance of brushing and combing. As a dog groomer I can’t stress this enough. Especially when it comes to breeds like Shih-tzu, Llasa Apso, Poodle, Bichon and also popular “low maintenance” crossbreeds like a Cockerpoo, Poochon, Labradoodle and other doodles and poodle crosses.
It’s common knowledge that dogs with a coat like the poodle don’t moult… Well, they do still lose the dead hair, however you won’t find these on your carpet or sofa, they stay in the coat. These curly and wavy hairs easily tangle with the other hairs and that causes matting if they are not removed. And if we don’t remove the hair and the coat gets matted, the air can’t move freely within the coat and fulfil its function as a natural insulator. It’s better to keep a coat like this at a reasonable length than to have it too long and matted. In the end, if the coat becomes very matted the only humane and discomfort-free option for your dog is to clip it off. If you struggle with regular bathing and brushing, take your dog to your groomer just for a bath & brush between your regular styling sessions and everybody will be happy.
And more in our next Newsletter on the importance of paw health in both summer and winter, what are the signs to look for and how to deal with cracked paws and other paw-related problems.
Jitka xx
Ps: Don’t forget to order the summer essential Vita Canis Tick Off 

Tick Off

The magic behind the Tick Off and Ear Cleaner

July 14th, 2017

Tick Off & Ear Cleaner on special offer again!


These popular products are 100% natural  as are all Vita Canis products. Let me briefly explain how they work.
Ear Cleaner
The Ear Cleaner contains some powerful anti-bacterial, anti–fungal, anti-inflammatory and anti–viral ingredients: Aloe Vera, Geranium, Witch Hazel and Lavender hydrosols, also called flower waters; and also two powerful essential oils: niaouli and lemon. Niaouli essential oil is a gentle relative of the very popular Tea Tree oil. It is gentle and well-tolerated, a perfect oil for allergies manifesting themselves in the ear. It has powerful anti-histaminic and anti-bacterial properties. Lemon essential oil is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal as well as being an immunostimulant, meaning it helps to strengthen the body’s immune system.
As you can see, the word anti-bacterial is mentioned a few times. The biggest difference between natural and synthetic anti–bacterial products is that bacteria can build up a resistance to synthetic products but not to natural ones. “Why?” You ask. The simplest way to explain is that the synthetic product is always the same, each and every time, forever… So when bacteria come into contact with a synthetic anti-bacterial product for the first time, or the first few times, it gets killed. However, with a few more contacts the bacteria realise, actually we know how this works, we’re not scared of this one any more, it comes here all the time, acts the same way, nothing new – so we’ll just build our shield and protect ourselves… And become resistant.


On the other hand, natural products, like essential oils or flower waters, are slightly different every time. Essential oils are made up of different molecules. These molecules and their exact concentration in a particular oil are influenced by outside factors like sunlight, rain, temperature, altitude, etc. Because these factors are constantly changing, the concentration of molecules changes too. This is the reason why two batches of essential oils can never be exactly the same; very, very similar, but not exactly the same. And this is why bacteria can’t build up resistance to essential oils… Each time the bacteria come into contact with the “same” essential oil, or natural product, it’s teeny tiny bit different from the last one… and the bacteria says something like “Holy sh…” and there it is… dead.
Tick Off
Ticks operate mainly by using their sense of smell. Ticks don’t jump or fall from trees; instead, they do something called “questing.” That is, they climb to the top of a blade of grass or plant and stick their front legs up in the air, waiting for the scent of a victim walking by. If you find one on your head, then it crawled there (ticks don’t jump) . Their front pair of legs have what are called Haller’s organs, which detect smell, temperature, movement and carbon dioxide. This is how they know you’re coming. They love warmth and moisture and are just waiting for a warm, moist environment to call home, such as your dog, you… The great discovery is that, for some reason, they are not attracted to the scent of some essential oils. Yippee!!
Certain essential oils smell soooo disgusting to ticks (it’s like the smells of food you don’t like or something even worse… cooked tripe… blah), that they would rather go hungry than come any closer to your dog! These include geranium, grapefruit, cedarwood, rosewood, lemongrass… all of these are in Vita Canis Tick Off, of course.

So if you want to keep your dog’s ears clean and infection-free and protect your furry friend from ticks, Vita Canis has the answer, naturally!

Ear troubles

July 4th, 2017

                                                                                      

Nicci and I (and our dogs) spent two weekends in June at dog shows, Dog Fest, at Arley Hall in Cheshire, and Dogs Unleashed, at Bakewell in Derbyshire.
We had a great time, meeting our customers, introducing Vita Canis products to new people, cuddling dogs, and enjoying the weather. The new banner for our latest product, Vita Canis Ear Cleaner, drew lots of attention! People were coming to our stand and telling us all about their dog’s ear problems. I couldn’t believe how many! Actually, I could because as a dog groomer, I see ear problems on a daily basis… but still, it was surprising just how many.
After Dog Fest Nicci suggested we should bring some cotton wool to the next show, Dogs Unleashed, and show people how to use our product, the Ear Cleaner. What a great idea!! So I made a sign offering free ear cleaning and got loads of cotton wool. Over the weekend at Dogs Unleashed I cleaned hundreds of ears… small, big, flappy, hairy, stinky, pinky… you name it, I cleaned it! To my surprise, some people didn’t know they should check their dog’s ears; and often, if they did know, they didn’t know exactly what to do or were frightened to do it.
“What should we be looking for?” “I am scared to do it…” “He won’t let me do it…” “Help!!”
Here are some facts about a dog’s ear, what are we looking for when we check the ear and how to clean it:
Ear infections in dogs are most commonly caused by a range of factors, including bacteria, yeast, ear mites, excessive hair, moisture or wax, foreign bodies and allergies. Because the ear canal in dogs is mostly vertical (unlike the human ear canal, which is horizontal), it is easy for debris and moisture to be retained in the canal itself leading to problems.


If your dog shows sudden signs of:
ear pain
inflammation of the ear flap (redness)
ear odour
discharge
continual head shaking
or drooping of the ear,
please have your veterinarian check it out. There may be an infection or it could even be that a foreign body is present causing the infection.
Methods of transmission of infection include direct penetration from the external environment, overgrowth of microflora in the ear itself, perhaps due to stress, hot weather or other factors: immunosuppression or injury, for example.
If there is no foreign body present in the ear and you wish to use a totally natural treatment, time to try Vita Canis Ear Cleaner

The best preventative care is regular checking and cleansing of the ear. It’s very good to start from an early age so your puppy gets used to it. While playing, gently hold the ear, massage, turn over the ear flap…
If your dog has a lot of hair coming from the ear canal, this hair may need to be plucked, or at least some of it, to help free flow of air to the ear. You can do this quite easily with your fingers. Gently but firmly hold a little bit of the hair growing inside the ear and pull. Do just a little bit at the time to avoid discomfort. There are also special ear powders that may help you in gripping the hair.
It is important to bring your dog along slowly so that he/she associates ear cleaning with something positive. Always have treats ready to offer each time your dog is well-behaved during the process.
Just like with human ears, you never want to use cotton buds because they can hurt your dog’s ears, instead use cotton wool or cotton pads.
Shake the product well. Wet a cotton ball with Vita Canis Ear Cleaner and wipe the part of the ear that you can easily see, the inside of the outer flap. Then wet a new cotton ball to clean a little further into the inner ear. Make sure you use a new piece of cotton wool for each ear. Ideally, you want to do this about once a week to keep your dog’s ears free from infection and smelling sweet.

Happy ear cleaning!
Jitka xx

NEW PRODUCT – Vita Canis Ear Cleaner

April 14th, 2017

 

Following extensive research Vita Canis are delighted to launch a specially formulated 100% natural ear cleansing solution. Packaged in a 100ml pump spray bottle, Vita Canis Ear Cleaner is easy to use – simply spray onto a cotton ball or pad and then gently wipe the inside of the outer ear.

Vita Canis Ear Cleaner is manufactured from 100% natural ingredients making it totally safe and effective. Ingredients include Geranium, Witch Hazel and Lavender hydrosols, Aloe Vera, Vitamin E together with Niaouli and Lemon essential oils. This unique blend of essential oils and hydrosols have anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic properties to help soothe and protect for optimum ear health.

Vita Canis Ear Cleaner does NOT contain any antibiotics, steroids, alcohol, or toxic materials of any kind.

Click here for more information

ear-cleaner-new

Vita Canis named PIF Grooming Business of the Year

November 11th, 2016

Vita Canis was named Grooming Business of the Year at this year’s Pet Industry Federation (PIF) Awards, at a ceremony at The Mansion House, Wokefield Park Hotel near Reading on Tuesday 1st November.

The award was open to all grooming businesses with the award judges looking for a consistently high level of overall excellence with a high achievement in several commercial areas including customer service and satisfaction, animal welfare and innovation.

The award was presented by actor and comedian, Chris Barrie, and organised by the PIF, who is the membership association for pet industry specialists in the UK, with all members committed to the highest standards of animal welfare and customer care.

Jitka and Klaudia receive the award from Chris Barrie

Jitka and Klaudia receive the award from Chris Barrie

On receiving the award, Vita Canis founder and owner Jitka Krizova commented, “We are absolutely delighted to have won this prestigious award. This is recognition of the dedication and hard work from all within the Vita Canis team and our commitment in providing a first class grooming service together with loving pet care. We feel so lucky to work in an industry we love and we would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to each person who voted for us.”

Vita Canis is a professional dog grooming salon and spa located near Uttoxeter, Staffordshire. Vita Canis offer a complete dog grooming service using only natural grooming products in a relaxed and comfortable environment. Each member of the grooming team is fully qualified and award winners in their own right including Best in Show at British Groomer of the Year, Eurogroomer, Best in Show at Groomania and Mastergroom Best in Show.

Vita Canis team from left to right Klaudia Szonji, Jitka Krizova and Zoe Oakes

Vita Canis team from left to right Klaudia Szonji, Jitka Krizova and Zoe Oakes

Demonstrating its passion for offering and living an environmentally friendly lifestyle, Vita Canis also manufacture their own range of 100% natural pet care products. Using only high quality, natural ingredients, all products are handmade in small batches ensuring that each product is mixed and blended to its exacting formulation and packaged for long lasting use. Products include Aromatic Dog Sprays, Paw and Hand Butter, natural solutions for itchy skin relief, anxiety relief and Tick Off, which repels ticks naturally through the use of high quality essential oils.

Sarendon win Lakeland Terrier Best of Breed at Crufts 2015

March 11th, 2015

We were delighted to win the Lakeland Terrier Best of Breed at Crufts with Adele (Sarendon Don’t Stop me now). Adele is three years old and lives with us and her best friend Martha and a few others (see below). Adele’s grandfather Denis won Best of Breed at Crufts in 2005 and her mum Ginger also won Best of Breed at Crufts as well as Best in Show at the National Terrier Show.

We had further success with Martha (Gemma Stonehenge Remuage) the Scottish Terrier which came second after Best In Show Winner Knopa in an open class of 22 entries. Martha who is 2.5 years old won the Best of Breed at The National Terrier Club Show 2014.

Vita Canis Products write up in Your Dog February 2015 issue

January 8th, 2015

We are delighted to be feature in the February issue of Your Dog Magazine.

your-dog-shopping-feb15

Vita Canis Products Wet Nose Testing write up in Dog World 24th October 2014

October 27th, 2014

WINTER draws on and along with the aroma of damp dogs, that smell as if they have been rolling in mushrooms, there are the delights of sore winter paws, chapped hands and spotty bellies – one would hope the spots were restricted to canine tummies of course! A grooming enterprise which knows all about the perils of winter is Vita Canis in Uttoxeter. Jitka Krizova LCGI is at the helm ably assisted by Klaudia Szonyi and partner John Averis, Pawscar ‘Exhibitor of the Year’ and of Saredon fame.

Wet Nose Testing

Vita Canis sponsor Bark in the Park

August 26th, 2014

We were delighted to once again sponsor Ashbourne Animal Welfare’s Bark in the Park fun dog show held in Darley Park, Derby on Sunday 24th August. Prizes were awarded in a range of categories, including “most handsome dog”, “waggiest tail”, “best expression” and “prettiest bitch”. The weather for the day was perfect and we would like to say a big thank you to everyone who came along to support the event.

As well as donating some Vita Canis Floral Spray and Comfort Blend to the rescue we also had a stand. Thank you to everyone who came along to find out more about our products.