Do you know which common foods are not good for your dog?

August 1st, 2018

My dogs are all raw fed and they are thriving on this diet.

My old girls, Rosie, 14 and Kimi, 14.5, don’t even look close to their age .. still ageless! Apart from Kimi now being completely deaf, so we have both needed to learn a new ‘sign’ language. Rosie is also now becoming hard of hearing, and I only recently noticed this when she didn’t respond to the fridge door opening.

My dogs, especially my Welshies, are real scavengers. They will eat anything they find, hunt, or steal … and there have been a few times when they’ve really made me worry. Once, around Christmas, Rosie and Jasmine snuck into our grooming salon kitchen, they somehow opened the cupboard, pulled out a large box of Thornton’s chocolates and managed to eat a few pieces before being noticed … luckily (although still worrying) the chocolates were all milk chocolates, containing a smaller amount of theobromine. Theobromine is toxic for dogs and other pets at certain doses as dogs can’t metabolize theobromine as effectively as humans and this allows it to build up in their system until it reaches a toxic level.

If you ever suspect that your dog might’ve eaten chocolate, contact your vet immediately. Rosie and Jasmine didn’t have any of the warning signs of poisoning which are: extreme thirst; diarrhoea; too much energy; pacing; panting; shaking; seizures.

Another time my dogs made me worry was when Rosie ate a few Brazil nuts which I didn’t know. She skilfully pinched them from my handbag. I could see she wasn’t herself at all, and her winds… uuuuh, horrible!! I thought she’d eaten something dodgy on our walk, but she was still eating, and drinking normally at home, so I didn’t panic and just observed her. After around 2 days she vomited out the undigested, slightly fermented, and rather smelly Brazil nut! After the culprit was expunged and identified, I did my research and found out that, thankfully, Brazil nuts are not toxic to dogs, but are high in fat and not easily digested, so a dog that eats Brazil nuts may experience an upset stomach. Yep, that was my greedy Rosie!!

When you are nuts about nuts like me, make sure you keep your Macadamia nuts away from your dog. These nuts contain an unknown toxin that can lead to neurological issues and are very, very high in fat, which can put your dog at risk of serious gastrointestinal distress or even lead to pancreatitis.

Other common foods we need to avoid feeding our dogs are:

Grapes and raisins – both can cause kidney failure and can be fatal
Onion – causes anaemia and should not be fed in any form. Signs of poisoning include diarrhoea, vomiting, lethargy and difficulty breathing
Avocado – extremely healthy for us, but not for our dogs. Avocados contain Persin, a substance that is also found in the leaves and the bark of the avocado tree. Persin is harmful to dogs, however in a different degree depending on the size of the dog and some other factors. Some dogs are not affected by Persin at all, while some may get mild nausea, may vomit and/or other more serious problems
Tomatoes – in large amounts can cause coughing, seizures, blood clotting
Garlic – it is questionable, but I like this article about why and how to feed garlic to your dog: https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/garlic-for-dogs-poison-or-medicine/

In general what is healthy for us is not always healthy for our dogs. We have to keep in our minds that a dog’s digestive system is different to ours, and we have to respect and feed our dogs according to this.

And keep your cupboards closed, or even better locked… and hide the key!! Dog’s can be very crafty and determined when it comes to food 😊

Jitka xx

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One response to “Do you know which common foods are not good for your dog?”

  1. David Tucker says:

    We used to have a Lakeland terrier that could open kitchen cupboards he would scratch at the bottom of the door and pop it open just enough to get his nose in we had to fit plastic child locks.
    My wife and I are well aware of what food consequences can do to dogs our last pair Holly had spikes disease or canine cramping from the age of 2 at the time we didn’t have a lot of joy from vets but over time and talking to people a change in food keeping grain free eventually we took her off the shelf so-called dog foods & red meat. We started feeding a diet of white fish or chicken freshly cooked with mashed potatoes and carrots the carrot was raw but chopped just bulk food up. She finally died at 10 years of age probably the most loving Welsh terrier with ever had.

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